April 23, 2014

 

Nominations are being sought for the 2013 Donner Medal in Canadian Studies. Please submit nominations by September 1, 2013 to info@acsus.org.

The Donner Medal in Canadian Studies is presented biennially by The Association for Canadian Studies in the United States (ACSUS) for distinguished achievement, scholarship and program innovation in the area of Canadian Studies in the United States. 

The recipient is selected by a committee of members of the Association after nominations have been publicly solicited. Nominees can include a person in any field who has made a significant contribution to Canadian studies in the United States during a reasonable period of residence in the U.S., even if no longer a resident. Current officers of ACSUS are ineligible for consideration. The primary criterion for selection is contribution to Canadian studies in the United States. The recipient shall have been active in and made contributions in at least one of the following categories: teaching, scholarship, administration, public affairs. 

2011

George T. Sulzner was awarded the 2011 Donner Medal in Canadan Studies.

George Sulzner has been one of the most important contributors to the success of Canadian Studies in the United States.  His service as a scholar and teacher on the subject of Canada has been, for decades, outstanding, as evidenced by the dozens of influential publications in this field that he has authored, throughout his career.  His work as a mentor to other Canadian studies scholars (including myself) has been instrumental in guiding careers in this area.  He has served as an active member and elected officer, in several capacities, of ACSUS and other organizations that are dedicated to Canadian Studies.  That service has included President of the Middle Atlantic and New England Council for Canadian Studies [MANECCS] and, of course, President of ACSUS.  His contributions to his discipline have been so sustained and exemplary that the George Sulzner International Fund (which provides financial assistance to Master’s level Public Policy and Administration students pursuing unpaid or low-paying internships) was created by the University of Massachusetts in his honor. 

However, his tenure as president of ACSUS, while notable in itself, rose above the normal accomplishment of service to Canadian studies.  He bolstered the organization’s finances, led the effort to sustain governmental funding for Canadian studies, promoted the cause of attracting new membership, and inspired his colleagues, nationally and internationally, to renew their commitment to this interdisciplinary endeavor. 

 

20/20 Vision Awards

In 2009, ACSUS used the occasion of its 20th biennial conference in San Digo to recognize twenty individuals who have made major contributions to the development of ACSUS and Canadian Studies in the 

United Statesover the last several decades.   These individuals have given of their time, energies and ideas to make the organization and its various undertakings a success over the past several years.

Bios

20/20 Vision Award Recipients 

  • Ellen Babby, American Council on Education  
  • Bob Babcock,UniversityofMaine, Orono
  • Louis Balthazar, Universite du Quebec aMontreal
  • Tom Barnes,UniversityofCaliforniaBerkeley
  • Myrna Delson-Karan,St. John’sUniversity
  • Bryan Downes,WesternWashingtonUniversity
  • Gerry Foley, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Earl Fry,BrighamYoungUniversity
  • Diddy Hitchins,UniversityofAlaskaAnchorage
  • Jim Horseman,UniversityofLethbridge
  • J.J. Jockel, St. Lawrence University
  • Mark Kasoff,Bowling GreenStateUniversity
  • Brian Long,Vancouver,British Columbia
  • Marty Lubin,PlattsburghStateUniversityofNew York
  • Ray Pelletier,UniversityofMaine, Orono
  • Dick Seaborne,Ottawa,Ontario
  • DavidStaines,UniversityofOttawa
  • George Sulzner,UniversityofMassachusettsAmherst
  • Ron Tallmann,RooseveltUniversity
  • Bob Thacker, St. Lawrence University

 

Donald K. Alper Awarded 2007 Donner Medal 

Dr. Donald K. Alper, Director of the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University since 1993, is renowned in for his advancement of Canadian Studies in the United States. He continues to build bridges between the two nations through his personal, professional and academic achievements in outreach, research, publication and service. Besides his directorship of the Canadian Studies program at WWU, Don Alper is a Professor of Political Science and Director of the Border Policy Research Institute. Under Alper’s direction and in their totality, the programs have had enormous national impact on educational directives, governmental policy, business practices and international relations. He is the recipient of three Merit Awards as well as a Retention/Recruitment Award at Western for excellence in teaching and the time he devotes to working directly with students. Most recently, he was instrumental in making Western the new home of the American Review of Canadian Studies (ARCS).

Alper is also an important advocate for Canadian Studies on a broader scale. Early on, he began to build a body of publications in Canadian Studies that, just since 2000, include books, refereed articles, articles in edited volumes, book and manuscript reviews, proceedings, and conference papers. He has led the Association for Canadian Studies in the US as councilor, committee chair, and two-term vice president and two-term president. He has presided over the Western Canadian Studies Association, and served as a member of the Executive Council for the Pacific Northwest Canadian Studies Consortium since 1987.   He is an active member of several editorial boards, including ARCS. BC Studies: The British Columbia Quarterly, and Journal for Borderland Studies, and has often been invited aboard special commissions since first being appointed to the Special Expertise Advisory Group on Canadian National Policy to Mr. Robert L. Wenman, Member of Parliament, in 1976. Don Alper’s informed opinion is regularly sought by education, business and government organizations as well as local, state and national media from both sides of the border. 

THE MEDAL 

The Donner Medal in Canadian Studies is presented biennially by The Association for Canadian Studies in the United States (ACSUS) for distinguished achievement, scholarship and program innovation in the area of Canadian Studies in the US. 

The recipient is selected by a committee of members of the Association (appointed by the president of the organization), including some with a knowledge of the development of Canadian studies in the US.,  after nominations have been publicly solicited. Nominees can include a person in any field who has made a significant contribution to Canadian studies in the United States during a reasonable period of residence in the U.S., even if no longer a resident. Current officers of ACSUS are ineligible for consideration.The primary criterion for selection is contribution to Canadian studies in the US. The recipient shall have been active in and made contributions in at least one of the following categories: teaching, scholarship, administration, public affairs.  

The award itself is made possible through the interest and support of the William H. Donner Foundation of New York City. In 1975 the Donner Foundation made a grant to ACSUS to fund the designing and striking of several medals to be known as “The Donner Medal in Canadian Studies.” 

The medal was designed by Dora de Pédery-Hunt, a distinguished Canadian sculptor and an Officer of the Order of Canada.

Past Donner Medal Recipients